DUST OF EDEN

Book Title: DUST OF EDEN
Author: Mariko Nagai
Category: Children's
Publisher: Albert Whitman & Company
Description:

The verse format of Out of Dust meets the realistic intensity of Farewell to Manzanar

"We lived under a sky so blue in Idaho right near the towns of Hunt and Eden but we were not welcomed there." In December 1941, thirteen year-old Mina Masako Tagawa and her Japanese-American family are sent from their home in Seattle to an internment camp in Idaho. What do you do when your home country treats you like an enemy? This memorable and powerful novel in verse, written by award-winning author Mariko Nagai, explores the nature of fear, the value of acceptance, and the beauty of life. As thought-provoking as it is uplifting, DUST OF EDEN is told with an honesty that is both heart-wrenching and inspirational.

Mariko Nagai was born in Tokyo and raised in Belgium and the United States, where she graduated from NYU's creative writing program. She has received numerous awards and fellowships for her poetry and short stories. She teaches creative writing at Temple University in Japan. This is her first book for children.


Notes:

Mariko Nagai

http://www.mariko-nagai.com/#!dust-of-eden/cq9u
http://www.childrensillustrators.com/industry-insider/interviews/Nick-Tiemersma/id=60/
http://poetryforchildren.blogspot.com

Award-winning Author of the spring 2014 Middle-Grade Multicultural Novel in verse


ISBN: 978-0807517390
Price: $16.99
CopyrightDate: 2014

Reviews

"Crystal-clear prose poems paint a heart-rending picture ...engaging...earnest, impassioned."

Kirkus


“An honest and thoughtful exploration of a complicated chapter in American history … the book’s strong narrative voice and solid imagery will help contemporary readers understand those complexities.”

Bulletin


“Nagai’s crystalline phrases, stanzas, lines that barely cover 120 pages prove gorgeously resonating.”

Book Dragon at the Smithsonian: http://bookdragon.si.edu/


"I love how this story respects its readers. It's a hard thing to know, that the United States once treated our Japanese citizens this way. Mariko Nagai does not soften the reality of what happened, but by giving her main character a loving family and a loyal best friend, she makes it bearable for readers to take this journey with her. This is an important story, beautifully told."

Helen Frost
Printz Award Honoree and author of Salt and Crossing Stones